A Manual for Re-Engineering Living Shorelines to Halt Erosion and Restore Coastal Habitat in High-Energy Environments

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January 2019

About this resource

Shorelines with high boat wake and wave energy face especially rapid erosion and habitat loss. A new living shoreline design from researchers at the University of Florida and the Guana Tolomato Matanzas Reserve that uses gabion-breaks has proven successful in high-energy environments. The gabion-break design uses two lines of defense to reduce erosion along the marsh edge – porous wooden breakwalls placed in front of structures that will foster oyster growth.

This manual for restoration practitioners describes a collaborative research project that tested gabion-breaks along the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in northeast Florida. It discusses the project’s results and details the steps to use gabion-breaks, including planning, design, maintenance, monitoring and costs.

Learn more about the project(s) and related resources: 
Collection(s): 
Living Shorelines